Saskatoon Chamber Summit, November 8, 2018

    Today the Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce held their inaugural “Chamber Summit” The event allowed members to convene and discuss the most pressing issues facing their businesses.

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    The highlight of the event was a presentation from Valerie Chort, Vice President Corporate Citizenship for RBC and Executive Director of the RBC Foundation, her presentation discussed the future of work in the age of disruption, with reference to an RBC report entitled “Humans Wanted”. (www.rbc.com/humanswanted)

    The report acknowledges that the next generation is entering the workforce at a time of profound economic social and technological change.

    RBC Future Launch is their commitment to help young people prepare for and navigate a new world of work that will reshape Canada.

    RBC’s skills assessment across 300 occupations and 2.4 million expected job openings shows an increasing demand for foundational skills such as critical thinking, coordination, social perceptiveness, active listening and complex problem solving.

    Virtually all jobs will place significant importance on judgement and decision making and more than two thirds will value an ability to manage people and resources. Automation and digital literacy will be key elements our evolving economy will demand.

    The ability to interpret and identify the insights from information are the skills businesses will be recruiting, engaging and retaining. RBC’s report “Humans Wanted” concludes that the age of automation need not be a threat, if we apply our humanity – to be creative, critical and collaborative – it can be a competitive advantage.

    The Chambers inaugural summit was well received, the discussions were enlightening, and the exchange of member opinions will assist the Chamber to develop an advocacy platform from which to lobby various levels of government. Congratulations to the Chamber leadership for helping to make Saskatoon a better community.

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